Category Archives: TED

Rubrica dell’ONSDAG

TED > Guaranteed basic income

“Ideas can and do change the world,” says historian Rutger Bregman (from the Netherlands), sharing his case for a provocative one: guaranteed basic income. Learn more about the idea’s 500-year history and a forgotten modern experiment where it actually worked — and imagine how much energy and talent we would unleash if we got rid of poverty once and for all.

More on TED.com

TED > The history of Chocolate

Yea, I can’t imagine life without chocolate. You know, polar bears like chocolate of course (there are evidence of it in professional surviving manuals all around the dryland since 1689: “If you are hiking and suddenly a polar bear pop up, be polite and offer her/him a chocolate bar; you will have the two best rewards ever: your life back, and a happy polar bear!”). The bear’s favourite is the dark one! 😛

Well, I am so lucky I wasn’t born before the 16th century. Until then, chocolate only existed as a bitter, foamy drink in Mesoamerica (btw I am curious!!), as my friend Deanna uses to tell. But under the amazing taste of chocolate, lots of violations of human rights happened and still happens. Please get informed, my friend, please help me with more info, and please taste responsably. Today I will have a meeting about it with the seals 😉

Here it is Deanna’s story about the fascinating and often cruel history of chocolate. Sweet watching!! Growl 😉

Takk til Ted-Ed for videoen, and takk til Pexels for cocoas bildet!

TED > The secret to nonviolent resistance

We’re not going to end violence by telling people that it’s morally wrong, says Jamila Raqib, executive director of the Albert Einstein Institution. Instead, we must find alternative ways to conduct conflict that are equally powerful and effective. Raqib promotes nonviolent resistance to people living under tyranny — and there’s a lot more to it than street protests. She shares encouraging examples of creative strategies that have led to change around the world and a message of hope for a future without armed conflict. “The greatest hope for humanity lies not in condemning violence but in making violence obsolete,” Raqib says.